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National News Sir Keir Starmer

Is that because they are showing they are centrist and (small c) conservative? :)
Because they are less likely to have senior ministers who hate the country.

However, since I posted that I have seen the new plans for 1.5 million new build homes plastered across the country and deregulation of onshore wind.

So, I am back to cautious!
 
Because they are less likely to have senior ministers who hate the country.

However, since I posted that I have seen the new plans for 1.5 million new build homes plastered across the country and deregulation of onshore wind.

So, I am back to cautious!

Out of interest, why are you opposed to onshore wind farms?
 
Out of interest, why are you opposed to onshore wind farms?
I'm cautious, not opposed. In the right spaces they could work. However, they are typically massive, visible for miles around, and placed in stunningly beautiful parts of the country.

I'll await to see where they go (along with the hundreds of miles of new pilons we need to feed a massively artificially inflated population) before I decide where I land on it.
 
I'm cautious, not opposed. In the right spaces they could work. However, they are typically massive, visible for miles around, and placed in stunningly beautiful parts of the country.

I'll await to see where they go (along with the hundreds of miles of new pilons we need to feed a massively artificially inflated population) before I decide where I land on it.
I’m amazed that we’re not in a position of having much smaller wind turbines designed for home use, like we are with solar panels (couple of 30cm turbines on a roof kind of thing) and then in industrial estates slightly larger. It seems like its an industry that only have large and massive.

I’m no physicist so happy to be told why I’m being dumb on this one.
 
I’m amazed that we’re not in a position of having much smaller wind turbines designed for home use, like we are with solar panels (couple of 30cm turbines on a roof kind of thing) and then in industrial estates slightly larger. It seems like its an industry that only have large and massive.

I’m no physicist so happy to be told why I’m being dumb on this one.
I agree with you completely - and while we're at it, every new building in the UK (industry or residential) with a south facing roof should be required by law to have a minimum level of solar panel coverage.
 
I’m amazed that we’re not in a position of having much smaller wind turbines designed for home use, like we are with solar panels (couple of 30cm turbines on a roof kind of thing) and then in industrial estates slightly larger. It seems like its an industry that only have large and massive.

I’m no physicist so happy to be told why I’m being dumb on this one.

Should be pushing this in the same way they are pushing electric cars.
 
I’m amazed that we’re not in a position of having much smaller wind turbines designed for home use, like we are with solar panels (couple of 30cm turbines on a roof kind of thing) and then in industrial estates slightly larger. It seems like its an industry that only have large and massive.

I’m no physicist so happy to be told why I’m being dumb on this one.

I think the simplest answer is that wind speed is on average faster the higher you get. At surface level, there's all kinds of surface barriers (trees, buildings etc.) that slow the wind down. I know that the US DoE suggests that for a small electrical wind system to be effective, it needs to be at least 30 feet above anything within 300 feet......and not many people can easily achieve that. But massive, isolated wind farms obviously do.

If you can't do that, then the wind speed is rarely going to be high enough. There was a Carbon Trust paper (a few years ago now, mind) that showed that small turbines stuck on a roof tended to cost more energy to build than they ever generated in operation.
 
Should be pushing this in the same way they are pushing electric cars.
I think I remember seeing a new Sainsbury's a few (20?) years back near the M25 (not far from Heathrow iirc) which appeared to have a form of wind turbines on the roof.

I can only assume they didn't work out because they didn't catch on and I think they're no longer there/working.

Also, Sainsbury's have clearly gone down this route instead: https://www.sustainabletimes.co.uk/post/sainsbury-s-unveils-50mw-onshore-wind-farm-in-scotland

It is probably an economy of scale thing, plus wanting to put them in the windiest places available. Not to say small scale can't work, but is it capable of providing enough power/cost benefit?
 
I'm sure people smarter than me will know why, but with such a huge coastline, is wave power not a good option for the UK?
Wave and tidal power are both incredibly good ideas, given the wave energy and tidal range around the UK. The Severn barrage has been talked about of and on for years to harness one of the biggest tidal ranges in the world for hydropower, but astronomical costs of construction, environmental concerns (apparently some fairly unique and delicate wetland habitats could be badly affected) and nimbyism means it has never got off the ground.

There are small scale projects using wave power, but nothing significant, again because of cost.

There's even small scale hydropower on the Thames...and other rice. There's one at Osney lock in Oxford where they installed an Archimedes screw a few years back. No idea how reliable it is or indeed how many "houses" it could/does power though!
 
I’m amazed that we’re not in a position of having much smaller wind turbines designed for home use, like we are with solar panels (couple of 30cm turbines on a roof kind of thing) and then in industrial estates slightly larger. It seems like its an industry that only have large and massive.

I’m no physicist so happy to be told why I’m being dumb on this one.
Well, this guy agrees with you.

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Wave and tidal power are both incredibly good ideas, given the wave energy and tidal range around the UK. The Severn barrage has been talked about of and on for years to harness one of the biggest tidal ranges in the world for hydropower, but astronomical costs of construction, environmental concerns (apparently some fairly unique and delicate wetland habitats could be badly affected) and nimbyism means it has never got off the ground.

There are small scale projects using wave power, but nothing significant, again because of cost.

There's even small scale hydropower on the Thames...and other rice. There's one at Osney lock in Oxford where they installed an Archimedes screw a few years back. No idea how reliable it is or indeed how many "houses" it could/does power though!

They tried to do a hydro scheme in Abingdon on the weir using an archimedes screw but it wasn't financially viable.
 
They tried to do a hydro scheme in Abingdon on the weir using an archimedes screw but it wasn't financially viable.
Ah yes. I knew there was another in the area, but couldn't remember where. I think they're suceptable to both low and high flows and getting gummed up with debris too.
 
Wave and tidal power are both incredibly good ideas, given the wave energy and tidal range around the UK. The Severn barrage has been talked about of and on for years to harness one of the biggest tidal ranges in the world for hydropower, but astronomical costs of construction, environmental concerns (apparently some fairly unique and delicate wetland habitats could be badly affected) and nimbyism means it has never got off the ground.

There are small scale projects using wave power, but nothing significant, again because of cost.

There's even small scale hydropower on the Thames...and other rice. There's one at Osney lock in Oxford where they installed an Archimedes screw a few years back. No idea how reliable it is or indeed how many "houses" it could/does power though!

Worked there a few years back, still got part of an old monastery or nunnery there as well. Couple of newish blocks of flats that get a bit of power from it I think, not sure how much though but do remember the bloke who managed the site and had a workshop there as well saying something about it.
 
I'm cautious, not opposed. In the right spaces they could work. However, they are typically massive, visible for miles around, and placed in stunningly beautiful parts of the country.

I'll await to see where they go (along with the hundreds of miles of new pilons we need to feed a massively artificially inflated population) before I decide where I land on it.

Fair enough.

FWIW I drove up to Scotland a little while ago (where they seem to have an abundance of them) and I thought they were actually quite nice and in some ways added to the landscape, but I suppose it's a matter of opinion.
 
Fair enough.

FWIW I drove up to Scotland a little while ago (where they seem to have an abundance of them) and I thought they were actually quite nice and in some ways added to the landscape, but I suppose it's a matter of opinion.
Yep, love the ones on the A395 on the eastern edge of Bodmin. Even when I'm returning from holiday!
 
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