Laws of Physics and football

Marked Ox

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6 Dec 2017
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#1
I reckon the best thing that FIFA and the FAs could do is employ Physics Teachers in the summer break to explain to Refs and players that the laws of physics do apply to football and footballers. Watching decisions now (especially VAR decisions), simple collisions are deemed fouls when nobody has "lost control of their actions" but they will continue to slide on a wet surface for a bit as an example. 2 players running in directions that will intersect and are both looking at the ball but then collide does not mean that one of them has automatically fouled the other.

Maybe employ Biology teachers or medical doctors as well to explain that touching somebody on a shoulder, does not cause both legs to collapse at the same time.

***Rant finished***
 

ZeroTheHero

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#2
There was one occasion on Saturday when Jamie Mackie jumped for a header and then inexplicably started going sideways in the air due to the attentions of a Blackpool player. The ref blew and then gave a foul against Mackie. Presumably levitating is not only contrary to the the laws of physics but also football?
 

makv

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#3
The other thing that really bugs me is Rosie (and other football and cricket commentators) saying “the ball gathered pace”. No. No it didn’t. Physics doesn’t work like that.
 

ljs

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#4
The other thing that really bugs me is Rosie (and other football and cricket commentators) saying “the ball gathered pace”. No. No it didn’t. Physics doesn’t work like that.
What if a gust of wind catches a ball?
 

mooro

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13 Dec 2017
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#7
My favourite is where a defender is expected to dematerialise to avoid being done for obstruction of a player who kicks it past him and then runs straight at him. OF course there are occasions where the defender deliberately positions himdelf and/or moves to block the player, but not every time
 

holdsteady

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8 Dec 2017
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899
#8
I reckon the best thing that FIFA and the FAs could do is employ Physics Teachers in the summer break to explain to Refs and players that the laws of physics do apply to football and footballers. Watching decisions now (especially VAR decisions), simple collisions are deemed fouls when nobody has "lost control of their actions" but they will continue to slide on a wet surface for a bit as an example. 2 players running in directions that will intersect and are both looking at the ball but then collide does not mean that one of them has automatically fouled the other.

Maybe employ Biology teachers or medical doctors as well to explain that touching somebody on a shoulder, does not cause both legs to collapse at the same time.

***Rant finished***
Football pundits are just as bad, they will act as if a player could defy physics to back a ref up, they use the word control a lot for what is simply unavoidable unless you have the power to become intangible at will.

The rules have been changed to make attacking a lot easier to make the game more marketable, some fouls given are just a natural consequence of a game which involves kicking a ball and running.
 

Gary Baldi

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6 Dec 2017
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#9
There is also the way the legs splay so that the player can be as theatrical as possible and scream loudly. Blackpool's 15 had it down to a fine art last Saturday
 

Sarge

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#13
Didnt John Aldrige experience/ demonstrate a bit of an, err, bollockdrop of sorts, while playing for Ireland?
 
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