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Trouble is, older people still have much of the voting power as they sit in their fully paid for house they bought for half of what it's worth now. That's partly why younger people's opinions seem so outrageous - we're experiencing things the older generations never have.
You think that when the 'older people' who have paid off their house didn't struggle to pay the mortgage originally as well? Get over yourself. I haven't paid mine off yet, but had to take a second job to pay my mortgage when I first took the plunge into the housing market, and had to eat at parents / my then partner's parents one evening each a week because we still couldn't stretch to feeding ourselves for the whole week. Then there was the electricity card meter which was expensive and meant heating only 1 room in winter. It hasn't changed, it was hard then, it is hard now. The only difference is the numbers.
 
You think that when the 'older people' who have paid off their house didn't struggle to pay the mortgage originally as well? Get over yourself. I haven't paid mine off yet, but had to take a second job to pay my mortgage when I first took the plunge into the housing market, and had to eat at parents / my then partner's parents one evening each a week because we still couldn't stretch to feeding ourselves for the whole week. Then there was the electricity card meter which was expensive and meant heating only 1 room in winter. It hasn't changed, it was hard then, it is hard now. The only difference is the numbers.
Yeah, the 'numbers' have changed for the worse - much worse. In 1997, 89% of LAs had an affordability ratio of less than five times workers’ earnings, whereas only 7% had this level of affordability in 2022. The income to house price ratio has more than doubled since the 70's. You may have had your own struggles, but it's a fact that it is far more expensive to rent/own a home now. Not sure why pointing out that fact means I should 'get over myself'...:LOL:

And here-in lies the issue. Older generations think younger people are just bitching because 'things were hard when I was younger too'. Younger generations think older people are out of touch because they don't realise just how much *more* expensive most things are now (comparatively).

My opinion is things have changed at such a fast rate it's hard for the different generations to truly relate to each other. I'm a bit over 10 years older than the youngest member of my family - their upbringing is already so different to mine. Each generation has experienced the world in completely different ways, and neither seems willing to listen or try to understand the other.
 
Yeah, the 'numbers' have changed for the worse - much worse. In 1997, 89% of LAs had an affordability ratio of less than five times workers’ earnings, whereas only 7% had this level of affordability in 2022. The income to house price ratio has more than doubled since the 70's. You may have had your own struggles, but it's a fact that it is far more expensive to rent/own a home now. Not sure why pointing out that fact means I should 'get over myself'...:LOL:

And here-in lies the issue. Older generations think younger people are just bitching because 'things were hard when I was younger too'. Younger generations think older people are out of touch because they don't realise just how much *more* expensive most things are now (comparatively).

My opinion is things have changed at such a fast rate it's hard for the different generations to truly relate to each other. I'm a bit over 10 years older than the youngest member of my family - their upbringing is already so different to mine. Each generation has experienced the world in completely different ways, and neither seems willing to listen or try to understand the other.
You mean like this?
 
Yeah, the 'numbers' have changed for the worse - much worse. In 1997, 89% of LAs had an affordability ratio of less than five times workers’ earnings, whereas only 7% had this level of affordability in 2022. The income to house price ratio has more than doubled since the 70's. You may have had your own struggles, but it's a fact that it is far more expensive to rent/own a home now. Not sure why pointing out that fact means I should 'get over myself'...:LOL:
I have 2 kids who are getting on the property ladder now, plus one who is about to try to get her feet on the first rung, so see what they are having to do. It isn't massively different to my experiences at the same time of life. There are schemes like part buy which will help the younger generation to take the first steps. The first steps on the property ladder are always hard, no matter the generation.

The gap in mortgages to wages has increased, but not by a massive amount (Source, the dates are a few years out), but countering that the interest rates in 1990 were way, way higher, regularly above 10% and as high as 14%, as opposed to 5% now, which negates the difference. The struggle back then was just as hard as it is now, saying it isn't is incorrect.
 
Yeah, the 'numbers' have changed for the worse - much worse. In 1997, 89% of LAs had an affordability ratio of less than five times workers’ earnings, whereas only 7% had this level of affordability in 2022. The income to house price ratio has more than doubled since the 70's. You may have had your own struggles, but it's a fact that it is far more expensive to rent/own a home now. Not sure why pointing out that fact means I should 'get over myself'...:LOL:

And here-in lies the issue. Older generations think younger people are just bitching because 'things were hard when I was younger too'. Younger generations think older people are out of touch because they don't realise just how much *more* expensive most things are now (comparatively).

My opinion is things have changed at such a fast rate it's hard for the different generations to truly relate to each other. I'm a bit over 10 years older than the youngest member of my family - their upbringing is already so different to mine. Each generation has experienced the world in completely different ways, and neither seems willing to listen or try to understand the other.

And people paying mortgages in the 80s had long periods of interest rates far higher than even the top interest rate in the cost of living crisis. 14% in 1980 and it was still 10% in 1982. The lowest rate was approximately 7.4% over the whole decade. Far higher than now. And fixed rate mortgages were only introduced in 80s so vast majority would have been on variable rates.

Unemployment in the 1980s reached 3 million for the 1st time as was over that for at least 1980 to 1986 then it started to fall. Inflation was consistently high including 16.9% and 10.9% in 1980 and 1981 respectively. 5 years it was over 5%. Only 2 years it made it under 4% in 1986 (3%) and 1987 (3.3%) but by 1991 had peaked again at 7.6%.
 
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And people paying mortgages in the 80s had long periods of interest rates far higher than even the top interest rate in the cost of living crisis. 14% in 1980 and it was still 10% in 1982. The lowest rate was approximately 7.4% over the whole decade. Far higher than now. And fixed rate mortgages were only introduced in 80s so vast majority would have been on variable rates.

Unemployment in the 1980s reached 3 million for the 1st time as was over that for at least 1980 to 1986 then it started to fall. Inflation was consistently high including 16.9% and 10.9% in 1980 and 1981 respectively. 5 years it was over 5%. Only 2 years it made it under 4% in 1986 (3%) and 1987 (3.3%) but by 1991 had peaked again at 7.6%.
At least the youngsters now have their own cold war with Russia and fear of possible nuclear oblivion to be afraid of. Just like the 80s isn't it... :ROFLMAO:
 
I would love to say 'unbelievably' but sadly it's 100% believable. 🤦🤦🤦🤦

 
The problem with Europe is it doesn't spend enough militarily. Trump was absolutely right if certain countries prefer to spend money on socialism and not a strong defence then to be honest that is a free choice they made and they deserve to live in fear of invasion and it isn't Americas job to bail them out. Why should the American taxpayer provide military support to counties who aren't willing to fund it themselves? Personally I think the defence target should be 3% of GDP and I would rather spend the money on defence rather than benefits.
Hear Hear
 
Seriously, if ever there was an opportunity for someone to make a third party run at the Presidency, it's this year.

A large swathe of the most centrist Republican base won't vote for Trump; almost noone is enthused about Biden. If someone credible and heavyweight were to consider running, the 2024 electorate could easily split pretty evenly three ways.

It's just a matter of whether anyone credible and heavyweight will be willing to break ranks and do it (it can't be some centrist hack like Manchin, Sinema or Christie.......)
 
The fact that he could still run for president whilst in prison shows how absolutely mental America is.

Hopefully the Republicans drop him as their candidate and Biden also stands down for someone more competent, and we get a reset of politics over there.
 
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