DoE in car crash

andystroud

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If the accident was his fault I wonder if he will be prosecuted? Not sure a 97-yo should be driving anyway.
 

Gary Baldi

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I did think that. Glad no one was badly injured, but with his health issues, I do question if he should be driving. Presumably he will be tested to see if he is a safe driver.
 

Peterdev

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He’s a regular driver. As with so many near 100 year old drivers I notice he doesn’t wear glasses. The question of a sight test would be moe important.
I note the moped driver that was stabbed to death in London last week, was wearing a crash helmet, but no questions were raised as to why he was only 14
 

unification

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Firstly, I'm glad that all involved are ok. Even as a soft republican, it’s good to know Prince Philip is safe and sound.

Secondly, I am totally pissed off at the media coverage this has received. Front pages of the papers, second story up on BBC … Two people genuinely were hurt in this accident and they’re a footnote in the story as the talking heads blather away about the Duke of Edinburgh’s health and the wider point about elderly drivers. Two people who thankfully only suffered minor injuries who would have had worried relatives and people speculating about them have been shunted down the story to make way for outpourings of relief for a 97 year old royal because by the media’s reckoning the royals are better and more important than us plebs.

I won’t speculate on whether the DoE will be breathalysed or have his eyesight checked, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he wasn’t.
 

Sarge

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Firstly, I'm glad that all involved are ok. Even as a soft republican, it’s good to know Prince Philip is safe and sound.

Secondly, I am totally pissed off at the media coverage this has received. Front pages of the papers, second story up on BBC … Two people genuinely were hurt in this accident and they’re a footnote in the story as the talking heads blather away about the Duke of Edinburgh’s health and the wider point about elderly drivers. Two people who thankfully only suffered minor injuries who would have had worried relatives and people speculating about them have been shunted down the story to make way for outpourings of relief for a 97 year old royal because by the media’s reckoning the royals are better and more important than us plebs.

I won’t speculate on whether the DoE will be breathalysed or have his eyesight checked, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he wasn’t.
according to BBC news at 10 last night he was, along with female driver of the other car
 

Gary Baldi

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In all honesty, one of the worst drivers I've ever seen was in his early 50s. Mr, I doos whats speed I wants, I drives where I wants, I dint care. The sort of driver that always sees accidents in his rear view mirror.

That said, reaction times get worse as you get older and I do think there should be a heavier touch on older drivers health that is the same for people that suffer from epilepsy.
 

Sarge

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In all honesty, one of the worst drivers I've ever seen was in his early 50s. Mr, I doos whats speed I wants, I drives where I wants, I dint care. The sort of driver that always sees accidents in his rear view mirror.

That said, reaction times get worse as you get older and I do think there should be a heavier touch on older drivers health that is the same for people that suffer from epilepsy.
well said @Gary Baldi ..... I believe that after reaching a certain age its down to a GP to acertain if someone is fit to drive (or not)
yet, Im not sure if GPs have had training as driving instructors, so any assessment is mor along the lines of the individuals physical condition. which can be subjective at the very least.

frail elderly drivers generally react slower than they used to how they drive.... which can make it much more dangerous to other road users if someone unable to cope constantly with driving conditions of today, is allowed to continue driving even though they area risk to themselves and other road users.

on the other hand being able to drive does give a degree of independence to elderly drivers, however is that good enough reason to sign them off as fit to drive at the potential risks to other road users?

as for Phil the Greek, with Queen Lizzy as his other half, isnt there someone one employed to do things , including drive, for him?
 

Gary Baldi

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well said @Gary Baldi ..... I believe that after reaching a certain age its down to a GP to acertain if someone is fit to drive (or not)
yet, Im not sure if GPs have had training as driving instructors, so any assessment is mor along the lines of the individuals physical condition. which can be subjective at the very least.

frail elderly drivers generally react slower than they used to how they drive.... which can make it much more dangerous to other road users if someone unable to cope constantly with driving conditions of today, is allowed to continue driving even though they area risk to themselves and other road users.

on the other hand being able to drive does give a degree of independence to elderly drivers, however is that good enough reason to sign them off as fit to drive at the potential risks to other road users?

as for Phil the Greek, with Queen Lizzy as his other half, isnt there someone one employed to do things , including drive, for him?
There is nothing worse than removing the independence that driving gives from anyone and it's not something to take lightly. But if someone is barely able to walk up a set of stairs without getting out of breath but still drives, it worries me. We wouldn't let someone in poor health drive a lorry or bus, so why do we permit it with car drivers?
 

Sarge

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There is nothing worse than removing the independence that driving gives from anyone and it's not something to take lightly. But if someone is barely able to walk up a set of stairs without getting out of breath but still drives, it worries me. We wouldn't let someone in poor health drive a lorry or bus, so why do we permit it with car drivers?
indeed ....tis a quandry

my Dad, in his mid 80s now , still drives , over the past year or so, after years of no incidents whatsoever while driving, hes had a few minor 'bumps, ...invariably when parking'- bumps with gate posts a few times and once with a lamppost.... imo his ability to acertain distances has deteriorated noticiably. Which isnt good..... believe hes considering whether to continuing driving in the very near future.
 

Marked Ox

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well said @Gary Baldi ..... I believe that after reaching a certain age its down to a GP to acertain if someone is fit to drive (or not)
yet, Im not sure if GPs have had training as driving instructors, so any assessment is mor along the lines of the individuals physical condition. which can be subjective at the very least.

frail elderly drivers generally react slower than they used to how they drive.... which can make it much more dangerous to other road users if someone unable to cope constantly with driving conditions of today, is allowed to continue driving even though they area risk to themselves and other road users.

on the other hand being able to drive does give a degree of independence to elderly drivers, however is that good enough reason to sign them off as fit to drive at the potential risks to other road users?

as for Phil the Greek, with Queen Lizzy as his other half, isnt there someone one employed to do things , including drive, for him?
I have some doubts on GPs after my Grandad back in the day. He could hardly walk so was very heavy footed on breaking or accelerating yet drove for years like that, with regular small accidents, usually just him and a wall or something like that. His driving was that scary, I refused to get in a car if he was driving after 1 particular journey.

Yet the only check by the GP was once a year when he asked Grandad if he was ok to drive, Grandad would say yes and that was that.
 

Sarge

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I have some doubts on GPs after my Grandad back in the day. He could hardly walk so was very heavy footed on breaking or accelerating yet drove for years like that, with regular small accidents, usually just him and a wall or something like that. His driving was that scary, I refused to get in a car if he was driving after 1 particular journey.

Yet the only check by the GP was once a year when he asked Grandad if he was ok to drive, Grandad would say yes and that was that.
thats more or less still the GP 'assesment' these days... scary
 

Berliner

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I have some doubts on GPs after my Grandad back in the day. He could hardly walk so was very heavy footed on breaking or accelerating yet drove for years like that, with regular small accidents, usually just him and a wall or something like that. His driving was that scary, I refused to get in a car if he was driving after 1 particular journey.

Yet the only check by the GP was once a year when he asked Grandad if he was ok to drive, Grandad would say yes and that was that.
Was once driving in the passenger seat while my gran (then 80 or thereabouts) drove down a narrow street, was confronted by a car in front of her and - without braking - turned to me and asked what she should do. Don't think my a*sehole has ever puckered so quickly...
 
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